Pain Medication Helpline


 
There are so many medications on the market today. Treating illnesses with medication can help, but becoming dependant and creating addiction is a battle to overcome. Medications that treat pain can be addictive. Physical dependence, and tolerance is different from addiction. On the other hand with some cases of physical dependence, some withdrawal like symptoms can occur. The tolerance level of a medication can become weaken if taken over a long period of time, thus losing its effectiveness.
 

What is Addiction?

 
Addiction = psychological.
Addiction = behavioral.
Addiction = A reaction that develops in certain people with the use of sedative pain medicines.
 
Most of the time, addiction occurs in only a minor fraction of the public when narcotics are used under appropriate medical supervision.
 

Do You Have A Problem With These Drugs?

 

Addictive Pain Medications (Medical Name)

• Codeine
• Fetanyl
• Hydrocodone
• Hydromorphone
• Morphine
• Meperidine
• Oxycodone
 

Here Are Some Brand Names Of Some Reported Addictive Pain Medications

• Contin
• Demerol
• Dilaudid
• Duragesic
• Lortab
• OxyContin
• Percocet
• Percodan
• Tylox
• Roxicet
• Vicodin
 
 

Pain Medication Helpline

For More Information Please Call 1-866-535-7920


Prescription Pain Medicines – An Addictive Path?

Prescription Pain Medicines – An Addictive Path?

 
NIH MedlinePlus-2007 Article:
 
Many Americans may have been startled last summer when an Associated Press (AP) analysis of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration statistics showed that retail sales of five major painkillers rose 90 percent from 1997 to 2005.
 
The report revealed that ever-increasing amounts of prescription painkillers called opioid analgesics are being used on a daily basis. These drugs, which can become habit-forming over time if not strictly monitored by a health professional, are readily available with a prescription.
 
Now, researchers funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) have launched the first large-scale national study evaluating a treatment for addiction to these drugs, which include codeine, morphine, oxycodone (OxyContin), hydrocodone (Vicodin), and meperidine (Demerol). The study is a direct response to the growing national problem of prescription drug abuse in this country.
According to the 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the incidence of new nonmedical users of pain relievers is now at 2.2 million Americans aged 12 and older. This is greater than the number of new marijuana abusers (2.1 million). In 2005, more than six million Americans reported current (in the past month) nonmedical use of prescription drugs. That is more than the number of people abusing cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, and inhalants, combined.Read More…
 
 

Pain Medication Helpline

For More Information Please Call 1-866-535-7920

Addiction Therapy by David Arneson, ND Courtesy of NDNR

Addiction Therapy by David Arneson, ND Courtesy of NDNR

Addiction Therapy

David Arneson, ND

First of all, I am in recovery myself for more than 20 years, primarily from alcohol. Looking back at the journey, and my clinical experience treating alcoholics and drug addicts (over the last six years), I can say one thing with confidence – this is a body/mind/spirit disease. In fact, in the majority of cases, the clinician will come to the determination that this is little about drugs and alcohol and more about the need for the patients to anesthetize themselves from life in general. All the research in the world trying to find genetic determinants for alcoholism and, for that matter, drug addiction, have never determined a genetic cause per se, and never will. There is no gene in the human being that determines we are “doomed” to drink/drug our lives into oblivion. Unique genetics, life stressors, family and social stressors, improper nutritional intake and other factors affect biochemistry/neurochemistry. Depression and anxiety are the two most common symptoms early in recovery, and may exist before the first drink. Yet, it defies logic that as a profession we can treat most cases of alcoholism/drug addiction with Prozac or a multi-drug regime, and expect to find resolution of the diseases of dependency. However, an idea put forth by Terry Neher, DDS, CCDCIII, in an article entitled “Neuronutrient Therapy: A Study in Stabilizing the Stress of Recovery” (1993, p. 31), states our position clearly: “If we demand behavioral change from our patients without allowing them to bring their brain chemistry into more positive balance, we simply set them up for failure.”

Read More at Naturopathic News & Review (NDNR)